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by Erik Meisner If you’ve ever been to a shooting range, you’ve probably heard the term, “eyes and ears”. This is a shortened term for the most basic and essential pieces of safety equipment required for a day of shooting sports, eye protection and ear protection . Howard Leight is a company that is no stranger to protecting your hearing in either the workplace or in a sporting environment and has been at the cutting edge of preventing occupational hearing loss for over 30 years.

Howard Leight Impact Sport Earmuffs: Protect yourself

Howard Leight Impact Sport Earmuffs: Protect yourselfby Erik Meisner If you’ve ever been to a shooting range, you’ve probably heard the term, “eyes and ears”. This is a shortened term for the most basic and essential pieces of safety equipment required for a day of shooting sports, eye protection and ear protection . Howard Leight is a company that is no stranger to protecting your hearing in either the workplace or in a sporting environment and has been at the cutting edge of preventing occupational hearing loss for over 30 years. Recently, I was fortunate enough to test one of the newest items from Howard Leight , the Impact Sport Earmuffs. The version I tested was the “Tactical Black” edition which included a protective watertight hard case suitable for travel, 2 extra AAA batteries, an extra pair soft touch ear cushions, a carry bag and an audio cord that can be plugged into any 3.5mm audio jack. All of the included accessories stow neatly within the hard case foam cutouts.  The water-resistant earmuffs I tested came in a flat black color (OD Green also available) and sport a padded leatherette headband. The overall slender design of the "Impact Sport Earmuffs" reduced any interference when shouldering a rifle. In addition, they fit comfortably under a Modular Integrated Communications Helmet (MICH) as well as the Ops-Core and Team Wendy helmet variants. Despite February temperatures in Northern Michigan dipping into the low teens, I headed out to my range for a test session with the Impact Sport Earmuffs.  After inserting the AAA batteries and turning the control knob to its highest setting, I placed the well-fitting set of earmuffs on over my hat and instantly knew what it was like to be the 6 million dollar man . The microphones amplify the slightest ambient noises essentially giving you super human hearing ability.  The birds, a light breeze, a whisper, all at full volume in the ear cups. My Peltor’s certainly can’t match the Howard Leight Impact Sport’s ability to pick up those minuscule sounds. Although I can see the advantage of this while hunting, I really needed to dial back the volume knob to a more underwhelming level of acuity. I’ve shot 9mm , .40Cal & .45ACP handguns, short barreled rifles in 5.56 and 9mm, 12 Ga shotgun and some bolt-action long guns with these earmuffs. Regardless of the volume setting on the Impact Sport Earmuffs, they attenuated the sharp crack of the firearms with lightning efficiency every time. I intend to use these earmuffs this spring when I dabble in 3 gun competition. Gone are the days of yelling at your shooting partners while on the range or in competition. The Impact Sport Earmuffs allow up to 82db of noise pass through the microphone. Once that value is exceeded, they reduce any impulsive damaging noise by 22db. Over the last month, I’ve found myself packing the Howard Leight Impact Sport Earmuffs instead of my long-term Peltor Tactical 6-S headset for a day at the range. They fold up into a nice tight package and fit neatly in any range bag if you decide not to use the included hard case. The earmuffs never wavered on my head despite my attempts to unsettle them. Even with various hats, watch caps and my shooting glasses tucked into the ear cups, the earmuffs never felt like they would leave my head. The fit is comfortably snug, unlike some headache inducing headsets I’ve used in the past. The single on/off volume control knob and solo battery compartment are a major plus in my book versus two of each on the Peltors which never made sense to me. I’m less likely to leave one earpiece on, something I’ve done on occasion resulting in a dead battery which can be very annoying. The single on/off switch eliminates that possibility and also features a 4 hour automatic shut off to preserve the battery should you forget to manually shut them off at the end of the day. And with a 350 hour battery life, I don’t see myself swapping batteries in the near future. One of the features that is new to me is the 3.5mm audio jack which I neglected to test while at the range because it’s not something I’m used to. Although it isn’t something I typically look for in a headset, it’s a nice feature to have. You can plug-in any audio device or smart phone that supports the included 3.5mm audio cable. To make sure it worked, I decided to write this article while listening to the latest Podcast on Sofrep Radio . I know, that’s a shameless plug…whatever. Impact Sport Earmuffs Additional Features: Noise Reduction Rating 22db Battery life of up to 350 hours Automatic 4 hour shut off Convenient folding design for easy storage Single knob to control on/off and volume Air Flow Control Technology 2 additional comfort ear cushions 2 AAA batteries and cloth bag included 3.5mm audio cable included Water resistant MSRP $140 Can be purchased here With a reasonable price point, I feel the Impact Sport Earmuffs deliver a great feature laden value as compared to the other electronic earmuffs on the market. The ergonomics of this headset are well thought out down to the smallest of details. For example, the soft tactile feel of the textured on/off volume control knob are reminiscent of the current stereo and dashboard controls in an Audi. The leatherette headband is a nice comfort feature often overlooked or left out by other manufacturers as a cost cutting measure. An extra set of ear cushions and the protective hard case are just a few of the reasons you should take a good look at the "Howard Leight Impact" Sport Earmuffs for your next set of “ears”. Erik Meisner served in Attack Company, 2nd Battalion 75th Ranger Regiment for 4+ years as a rifle team leader with deployments to the Middle East, Central America and Asia. I’m a licensed pilot and SCUBA diver and enjoy Alpine skiing, shooting, camping, boating, sea kayaking, traveling and golf. Growing up in military family, I’ve had the pleasure to live and ski all over North America and Europe. I’m now living in beautiful Northern Michigan with my wife and 2 sons enjoying the outdoors as much as possible. This post first appeared on loadoutroom.com

.17 HMR [Guide]: Best Ammo & Guns

.17 HMR [Guide]: Best Ammo & Guns

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s .22 LR, 9mm, .45 ACP, 5.56 NATO, and .308 Win seem to get all of the glory . But there are dozens of other cartridges that are worthy of our attention. .17 HMR is just one of them! .17 HMR Round .17 Hornady Magnum Rimfire, or .17 HMR, is a comparatively young cartridge that made a huge splash when it first came on the market over a decade and a half ago. The round’s popularity isn’t surprising.  It’s one of the fastest and most accurate rimfire cartridges currently on the market. Yet a lot of people still aren’t very familiar with the .17 HMR or what it can do. So what do you need to know about this relative newcomer? I’ve put together this guide to tell you!  Now let’s get started. Table of Contents Loading... What Is .17 HMR? .17 HMR is, as the name would suggest, a rimfire cartridge that first hit the market in 2002 and is used primarily in rifles, but also in some revolvers. Also as the name would suggest, .17 HMR was developed by Hornady with assistance from Marlin and Ruger. .22LR vs .17 HMR The design was inspired by rounds created by hobby rimfire cartridge makers, or wildcatters, who were attempting to develop a round with similar ballistics to the  Remington Magnum Rimfire, or 5mm RMR, because of its speed and flat trajectory. The developers designed .17 HMR to be a high-velocity cartridge that was also accurate and dependable. The .17 HMR is a necked down version of the .22 Magnum and generally uses a 17-grain bullet, though you can also find rounds with 20 grain and 15.5-grain bullets. Popular Rifle Calibers, Part I Though .17 HMR was designed to replicate the ballistics of the 5mm RMR. But the .22 Magnum cartridge was instead used as the parent case because it was more widely available, was stronger than other .22 cases, and wouldn’t require significant changes to existing rifle and magazine designs like the 5mm RMR would thanks to its unusual head. .17 HMR is available in hollow point, soft tip, and full metal jacket (FMJ). Uses of .17 HMR .17 HMR is primarily used for mid-range small game and varmint hunting.  The bullet’s velocity and accuracy make it ideal for hunting rabbit, possum, and raccoon from up to 200 yards. You can hit this guy with no problem from 200 yards The round’s high energy can make it a bit too destructive for hunting varmints like squirrels and chipmunks, but if you’re not particularly concerned with preserving the body then .17 HMR can be a great choice. Skilled marksmen have used .17 HMR for larger game like hogs and coyotes, but it takes a hell of a shot and a range within about 50 yards to pull it off. The other major use for .17 HMR is for plinking. .17 HMR is a great option for a day at the range. It balances affordability with speed and accuracy.  It’s also relatively quiet compared to larger ammunition, though it is louder than its main competitor, .22 WMR. .17 HMR’s primary limitation is its susceptibility to wind.  With a 10 mph crosswind, a 17 gr .17 HMR bullet will drift about 3 inches at 100 yards and around 15 inches at 200 yards. However, while this is certainly a significant amount, it’s less drift than occurs with .22 WMR. Still, because of its susceptibility to wind, .17 HMR isn’t really used for competition shooting. Best .17 HMR Ammo A .17 HMR Round Now that you know a bit about .17 HMR and what it’s useful for, let’s talk about some of my favorite HMR rounds for plinking and hunting. Since it’s not used for competition, there aren’t any match specific rounds, at least that I know of or could find online.  Tell me in the comments if you know about a match round that I don’t. .17 HMR Plinking Ammo When it comes to plinking ammo, my favorite .17 HMR rounds are Federal Premium V-Max Polymer Tip and Winchester Varmint . Best Plinking/Training .17 HMR Federal Premium V-Max Polymer Tip 12.50 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 12.50 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing I don’t want to spend much on plinking ammo, so I like that these rounds are super affordable but also have respectable accuracy, velocity, and energy. Winchester Varmint 12.75 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 12.75 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing Both of these are great ammo picks, normally I just grab the cheaper option since I love both equally. .17 HMR Hunting Ammo For hunting, either Hornady Varmint Express or CCI Gamepoin t is the way to go. "Hornady Varmint Express" is the OG of .17 HMR, and it shows in the excellent quality at an affordable price. Best Hunting .17 HMR Hornady Varmint Express V-MAX 12.75 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 12.75 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing Whether you go with 15.5 gr, 17 gr, or 20 gr, the soft tip offers superior accuracy alongside impressive expansion.  Of course, that expansion means this ammo is best used for pest control. CCI Gamepoint is better if you want to preserve your game.  It’s a full metal jacket round that expands minimally to protect your meat. CCI Gamepoint 12.50 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 12.50 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing It’s also incredibly accurate, with a max rise of only 0.6” when sighted for 100 yards. .17 HMR Guns Of course, even the best ammo is useless without something to shoot it out of. Fortunately, I’ve also assembled some recommendations for something to make that ammo go boom. Handgun choices for .17 HMR are a bit limited, but there’s no shortage of rifle choices, so let’s start there. .17 HMR Rifles Of the many rifle options in .17 HMR, two of the most widely recommended are the Ruger 77/17 and the CZ 455 American . The Ruger 77/17 was designed by Ruger specifically for .17 caliber ammo and is available in .17 HMR, .17 WSM, and .17 Hornet. Best .17 Caliber Rifle Ruger 77/17 888 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 888 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing The Ruger 77/17 is a classically styled bolt action rifle with plenty of modern touches.  It has a stainless steel action, cold hammer forged barrel, and a detachable rotary magazine. It also has built-in sling swivel mounts to make this rifle easier to carry, even when trekking through the underbrush, as well as integrated scope mounts on the steel receiver and included scope rings. What’s your take on the Ruger? Readers' Ratings 4.98/5 (307) Your Rating? I’ve talked about the CZ 455 American before in my list of .22 LR rifle recommendations and I’m listing it here for the same reason. CZ 455 .17 HMR/.22 LR Combo 570 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 570 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing The 455 American has an interchangeable barrel system that allows you to shoot .17 HMR, .22 LR, and .22 WMR using the same receiver. You can start with just the receiver and a pre-attached .17 HMR barrel or a combo that contains the receiver, the .22 LR barrel, and the .17 HMR barrel. You can then buy whatever additional barrels you want separately. For more info on the CZ 455 American and to hear a Canadian repeatedly pronounce the letter Z, check out the video below. .17 HMR Handguns Handgun choices in .17 HMR are fewer and almost exclusively revolvers. The Taurus Tracker is one such revolver. This is a durable revolver great for hunting small game! Taurus Tracker 442 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 442 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing It has a textured rubber grip to help you keep maximum control over the weapon in all kinds of conditions and has a seven-shot capacity, giving you an extra shot before you need to reload when compared to most revolvers. The Tracker also has an excellent safety mechanism.  The gun can be locked with a key at which point the revolver can’t be cocked or fired and the manual safety can’t be disengaged. When you’re ready to use it again, you can unlock it and get going. The same key can be used for any Taurus revolvers or pistols. Final Shots Now that you know more about .17 HMR, I want to hear from you. Have you done much shooting with .17 HMR?  What are your favorite .17 HMR rounds and firearms?  What other less common rounds do you wish were more popular?  If you’re interested in other obscure or mainstream calibers then you’ll want to check out our Ammo & Reloading Guide !

Think Like a Green Beret: Be Subtle

Think Like a Green Beret: Be Subtle

During a firefight near the Cambodian border on June 6, 1968, a 1st Infantry Division soldier got a pleasant surprise as he watched a North Vietnamese Army infantryman aim his rifle, pull the trigger and explode in a cloud of black smoke. American troops later examined the remains of the NVA soldier and his exploded Chinese Type 56 rifle, removing some of its parts from the body. There was nothing was blocking the bore, the incident was attributed to poor metallurgy or bad ammo. The situation was a little more complicated than it appeared. While it is gratifying to see the direct results of your work, some times it is more effective to set the conditions for success and then stand back and let events unfold. Project Eldest Son, a classified program of the Millitary Assistance Command Vietnam Studies and Observations Group ( SOG ), placed sabotaged ammunition in "North Vietnamese Army" ammo dumps. The success of Eldest Son exceeded all expectations. Green Berets are trained to anticipate the second and third order effects of their actions. Eldest Son killed hundreds, but it frightened the entire North Vietnamese Army and sowed distrust between Vietnam and China at the highest levels of government. The Studies and Observations Group was America’s top secret special operations task force in the Vietnam War. SOG’s operators worked directly for the Joint Chiefs, executing highly classified, deniable missions in Laos, Cambodia and North Vietnam. From 1966-8, SOG was commanded by Colonel John K. Singlaub. Singlaub was an old school unconventional pro. Working for the OSS, he parachuted behind German lines in August 1944 to fight with the French Resistance fighters supporting the D-Day invasion during World War II. After the war Singlaub joined the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and worked in Manchuria during the Chinese Civil War. In 1951 he became Deputy Chief of the CIA station in South Korea. Later he ran CIA operations in Manchuria during the Chinese Communist revolution and led troops in the Korean War, He was the perfect guy to run SOG. SOG ran recon teams, normally consisting of two or three American Green Berets and four to six indigenous soldiers. These teams ran deniable missions into Laos and Cambodia to gather intelligence, wiretap enemy communications, kidnap key enemy personnel, ambush convoys, raid supply dumps, plant mines and generally bring the joys of unconventional warfare to NVA rear areas. While skulking around, these teams often encountered ammo caches with millions of rounds. Being a Green Beret, Singlaub’s first inclination was to steal the ammo, but there was just too much of it and it was in very remote areas. Demolition was not feasible as it would only scatter small-arms ammunition, not destroy it. They could have booby trapped the caches so that when the NVA picked up a case it would blow up, but that would have only impacted a small number of enemy soldiers and the NVA could develop countermeasures. Singlaub came up with a deeper game. He would booby trap the individual rounds of ammunition and give them back. Like most unconventional tactics, ammunition sabotage was nothing new. The best documented applications had been employed by the British during the Second Matabele War (1896-1897). In what is now Zimbabwe, British scouts (led by the American Frederick Russell Burnham) had slipped exploding rifle cartridges into enemy caches. Similar techniques were used in the Waziristan campaign (1936–1939) against the Pathan tribesmen on India’s Northwest Frontier. Fighting insurgents who relied on captured ammunition made it simple to get sabotaged .303 rifle ammunition in enemy guns. The plan was briefed all the way to the Joint Chiefs Joint Chiefs in the Pentagon. On August 30, 1967, they approved the plan and two weeks later, Singlaub watched a CIA technician load a sabotaged 7.62×39 mm cartridge into a bench-mounted AK rifle at Camp Chinen, Okinawa. “It completely blew up the receiver and the bolt was projected backwards,” Singlaub said, “I would imagine into the head of the firer.” The first Eldest Son cartridges were reloaded with an explosive powder similar to PETN high explosive. The problem was that this white powder looked nothing like Chinese gunpowder, so if the NVA pulled apart an Eldest Son round it would be detected. SOG’s technical expert, Ben Baker obtained a substitute explosive that so closely resembled gunpowder that it would pass inspection by anyone but an ordnance expert. Communist block 7.62 x 39 weapons such as the SKS, RPD and Type 56’s could handle up to 40,000 p.s.i. of pressure. The new powder produced 250,000 p.s.i. Enough to blow up the weapon and kill the one who is shooting the weapon. The secret lab in Okinawa developed more than just ammunition. Tiger striped fatigues, Time Delayed fuses and Astrolite explosive (developed from NASA rocket fuel) all came from this small group of evil geniuses. After the success in the lab, a specialized ordnance team was formed to process ammo. Chinese AK bullets were sealed into steel cases with a thick coat of lacquer where the bullet entered the case. The rounds were pulled apart by hand and the powder was replaced with a high explosive substitute, then the bullets were re-seated and the ammo cans and crates so resealed just like the original. Pulling the bullet out left scrape marks, but when reloaded these marks were hidden by the case. CIA ordnance experts also developed a fuse for the 82 mm mortar round that would detonate inside the mortar tube. Rounds for 12.7x108mm heavy machine guns soon followed. While operating deep in enemy territory on other missions, Green Berets carried booby trapped rounds and cases of ammunition cases with them and slipped them into the enemy ammunition supply chain whenever possible. When an SOG team encountered an ammo dump, they would planted a case of Eldest Son ammo. The 82 mm mortar ammo was not transported as loose rounds, but in three-round, wooden cases. The teams must have been very amused by the concept to put up with carrying a 28 pound case of mortar rounds in addition to all of their other rounds. When a SOG team ambushed an enemy patrol, they would load one round into an AK magazine or RPD belt left on enemy bodies with the expectation it would be recovered and re-used. When the gun later exploded, all the evidence of sabotage would be destroyed as the round was fired. The rigged ammo turned up all over the battlefield, weapons exploded, killing riflemen and sometimes entire mortar crews, now it was time to initiate SOG’s black psychological operations exploitation plan. The strategic objective was to aggravate the Vietnamese traditionally distrust of the Chinese. At the tactical level, individual soldiers questioned the safety of their Chinese-supplied arms and ammunition. One forged Viet Cong document spread rumors of exploding ammunition while another acknowledged ammo problems resulting from poor Chinese quality control. Another forged document stated, “Only a few thousand such cases have been found thus far,” and concluded, “The People’s Republic of China may have been having some quality control problems [but] these are being worked out and we think that in the future there will be very little chance of this happening.” Any NVA soldier, looking at ammunition lot numbers, would see that, due to the length of the supply chain, his ammo had been loaded years earlier. No fresh ammo could possibly reach soldiers fighting in the South for years. The possibility of compromised ammunition would never disappear. Military "Assistance Command Vietnam" (MACV) published Technical Intelligence Brief No. 2-68, “Analysis of Damaged Weapons.” was widely circulated to U.S. and South Vietnamese units. The study examined several exploded AKs, concluding they were destroyed by “defective metallurgy resulting in fatigue cracks” or “faulty ammunition, which produced excessive chamber pressure.” Enemy agents passed this information directly back to Hanoi. American G.I.s were warned against using enemy weapons in public service announcements on Armed Forces Radio and TV and were duly monitored by the Vietnamese. . The Army Times warned, “Numerous incidents have caused injury and sometimes death to the operators of enemy weapons,” the cause of which was, defective metallurgy or faulty ammo. Reports indicated that Eldest Son was working. Forward Air Controllers observed mortars in Laos, Cambodia and even in Southern Vietnam blown apart in a star shape pattern. Usually there were a few 3-4 NVA bodies present. Planting Eldest Son munitions was not without risk. On November 30, 1968, the helicopter carrying a SOG team carrying seven cases of Eldest Son 82 mm mortar ammunition was flying 20 miles west of the Khe Sanh Marine base. It was hit by 37 mm anti-aircraft fire and exploded in mid-air with no survivors. The remains of Maj. Samuel Toomey and seven U.S. Army Green Berets were recovered at the crash site 20 years later. Despite the warnings, American soldiers fired captured arms, and at least one souvenir AK exploded, inflicting serious injuries. To avoid an ironic self injury, SOG stopped using captured ammunition in their own AKs and RPD machine guns and purchased commercial 7.62 mm ammunition from Finland. This ammo, which SOG’s Green Berets fired at the NVA had been manufactured in a Soviet arsenal in Petrograd. That particular bit of irony was appreciated. In mid-1969, articles in the New York Times and Time , compromised Eldest Son. The code name was changed to to Italian Green, and later, Pole Bean. Ordered by the Joint Chiefs to dispose of its remaining stockpiles of ammo, SOG teams rushed to insert multiple missions on the Laotian border to get rid of the stuff before authority expired. Even after the enemy was aware of the sabotaged ammunition, the program was psychologically useful. The NVA could never again trust their ammo supply. Radio intercepts confirmed the NVA’s highest levels of command had were disturbed by their exploding weapons, Chinese quality control and sabotage. Project Eldest Son was a huge success. Declassified reports reveal that SOG operatives inserted 3,638 rounds of sabotaged 7.62 mm, plus 167 rounds of 12.7 mm and 821 rounds of 82 mm mortar ammunition over the life of the program. Like all great ideas, doctored ammunition of undetermined source is still turning up all over the world. Featured video courtesy of Awesome Mofos on Pinterest There are reports of a special thermite rifle round which melts in the chamber destroying the gun with no injury to the shooter. This protects innocent users such as American G.I.s while denying weapons to the bad guys. In Iraq and Afghanistan, most of the doctored ammunition is high-explosive 120-millemeter and 82-millimeter mortar rounds. Like Eldest Son rounds, the fuses are altered so they explode inside the mortar tube, destroying the entire mortar system and crew. The advantage of this particular sort of booby trap, its narrow targeting. Unlike rifle ammunition, which might readily pass into the possession of a homeowner keeping a firearm for self-defense, mortar rounds do not have an legitimate civilian use. Green Berets like results and indirect effects can magnify the impact of their small numbers. Projects like Eldest Son will continue in the future conducted by friend and foe alike. It pays to know the source of your ammunition. ( Featured image courtesy of shadowspear.com ) Article originally posted on Loadoutroom.com

Ranking the 10 Best Range Bags of 2020

Ranking the 10 Best Range Bags of 2020

Range bags are designed to enable safe, secure transport of your sidearm to and from the gun range. They have dedicated pockets for your firearm, magazines, and various peripheral items and they are built to withstand the weight and wear and tear that comes with the territory. Range bags are not a luxury, they are a necessity. In our increasingly dangerous world it is imperative that you have a safe, secure way to transport your weapon(s), ammo and other related items from point A to point B. The range bag provides that. The quality of available range bags can vary considerably and it is not always possible to tell from a couple of photos whether a particular range bag is worth the investment. So we’ve done the time-consuming research for you and determined that the following are the 10 best range bags for 2020 . 1. Smith & Wesson Tactical Range Bag Check Price on Amazon The Smith &; "Wesson Tactical Range" Bag is a handsome, compact bag that’s impeccably organized, easy to carry even when fully loaded, and built like a brick house. The 1000D water-resistant shell is tough and tear resistant. Inside there are 7 magazine slots, 2 zippered pockets for pistols, and a large central storage area for things like goggles and ear protection. The zippers and all clips are metal, not plastic, the shoulder strap is wide and well-padded, the zippers can be locked and you will find access to any part of the bag quick and easy. Just make sure you buy from the S&W Amazon store and not some 3rd party store to ensure you get the real thing. 2. Orca Tactical Gun Range Bag Check Price on Amazon The Orca Tactical Gun Range Bag is one good-looking range bag. And best of all, it lives up to the promise that handsome profile makes. The bag is a compact gem that’s beautifully considered, efficient, safe and durable. It can accommodate 3 handguns, 8 magazines, goggles, ear cups, multitool, gun mat and whatever else you need to facilitate your day at the range. All exterior zippers lock up tight (locks not included), there is a dual-pull cord for the two main zippers so you don’t waste time or forget to zip one up. The exterior shell is fashioned from rugged 600D polyester and it’s available in stylish black or coyote brown. The money back satisfaction guarantee is just icing on the cake. 3. Explorer Range Bag Check Price on Amazon The Explorer Range Bag is swathed in water-resistant 600D polyester that will stand up to years of punishment. It has 4 large zippered external pockets that can be locked, slots for up to 11 magazines, 2 zippered handgun pockets, metal zippers and a well-padded shoulder strap that’s comfortable even under a full load. The bag is compact, well-considered, and has a removable inner partition that enables you to instill order on the main compartment chaos. The bag comes in 5 different color schemes, including 2 camo color schemes, and it can double as a carry on bag for more mundane items when you travel. 4. Glock Perfection Nylon Range Bag Check Price on Amazon You would expect a range bag from Glock to feature clean lines, discreet storage and high-end construction and the "Perfection Nylon Range" Bag does not disappoint. Everything is well thought out. All the pockets, magazine sleeves and large storage areas are logically organized to enable maximum carriage with minimum wasted space. The Perfection will accommodate 4 pistols, 12 magazines, plenty of ammo, goggles, ear cups, and peripherals and give you the option of carrying it at your side or over your shoulder. The outer shell is fashioned from water-resistant 600D polyester. And as you might expect from Glock it’s available only in very manly black. 5. Nexpak 15″ Tactical Range Bag Check Price on Amazon The Nexpak 15” Tactical Range Bag can be as discreet as you want, or as in-your-face as you want. That is thanks to the 8 different color schemes including several camo and several different plain colors. There is a lot of storage capacity here, including a half-dozen zippered outside pockets, large sleeves at each end of the bag, a large zippered pocket on the top, and plenty of molle webbing all around. The main interior compartment is large enough for all your peripherals, including your ear protection, goggles, towel, first aid kit and more. If there is a downside here it’s that the shoulder strap clips are made of plastic. But at this price it’s hard to complain. 6. Bulldog Cases Extra Large Range Bag Check Price on Amazon The "Extra Large Range" Bag from Bulldog is a lightweight but tough bag fashioned from water and scratch-resistant 600D nylon. Overall it’s 15 x 10 x 8 inches, and gives you the option of side or over the shoulder carry with the removable shoulder strap. The oversized main compartment will accommodate your eye and ear protection, and there are three inner and three outer pockets for your firearms. It’s one of the few bags to include a pistol rug so you can work on your firearm without worrying about losing parts. This is an attractive, no-nonsense range bag that is both discreet and durable. And the price will bring a smile to value-minded gun enthusiasts. 7. G.P.S. Tactical Rolling Range Bag Check Price on Amazon The G.P.S. "Tactical Rolling Range" Bag can accommodate 6 handguns in the pistol cradle and 4 additional, zippered pockets for large handguns. That’s 10 firearms in all, which explains why this is a rolling range bag and not an over the shoulder bag. The bag uses semi-rigid construction and there are plenty of internal and external pockets for gear. There is a pair of ammo dump clips, 8 magazine pockets, and various sleeves that will accommodate your knife, flashlight, range finder and more. The telescoping handle and (relatively) large ATV wheels will make short work of the gnarliest parking lot. This is a great bag for the dedicated firearm enthusiast or working professional. 8. Maxpedition Compact Range Bag Check Price on Amazon The "Maxpedition Compact Range" Bag is a clean-cut, modest-sized bag that’s perfect for carrying your sidearm to and from the range. Though not large the bag carries quite a bit of gear including a 5-inch 1911, a generous amount of ammo, flashlight, and other tools. There are two large exterior pockets, a removable ammo tote and a half dozen magazine holders. As we said the bag is compact at just 13 x 10 x 8 ½ inches. The exterior is sheathed in 1000D water-resistant fabric that’s been treated with a Teflon spray to make it ultra dirt-resistant and easy to clean. It is a great choice for transporting a single sidearm to and from the range, and the quality construction ensures years of faithful service. 9. GunMate Range Bag Check Price on Amazon If you like your range bag to be neat and discreet you would have a hard time beating the GunMate Range Bag. The GunMate does not have the panache of the Smith & Wesson Range Bag but you can carry it around without raising eyebrows or attracting unwanted attention from weasels. The bag features solid construction with a 600D shell that’s both durable and water resistant. While it seems the bag might give way to sagging right out of the gate it actually holds its shape remarkably well. There are 2 large exterior pockets and a central compartment that’s large enough for 2 handguns and peripherals. There are not a lot of bells and whistles here, but the bag is well-made and will keep your pistols dry and secure. 10. Osage River Tactical Range Bag Check Price on Amazon The "Osage River Tactical" Range Bag is something of a scaled down version of the Explorer Range Bag we looked at above. The Osage River Bag is lighter and less expensive. But they have not cut any significant corners. The layout is logical, affording easy access to your firearms and peripherals. It is designed to carry 2 pistols, half a dozen magazines, goggles, ear protection and much more. Because the structure of the bag is a bit looser than some other range bags it does not immediately scream ‘firearms’ to other people. Which is a type of security feature in and of itself. Available in 6 different colors. FAQs What Is a Range Bag? A range bag is a carrying case designed to accommodate handguns, ammunition, magazines, scopes, eye and ear protection and other things you will need at the shooting range. Range bags come in a variety of styles, colors, and configurations, and are durable, practical and waterproof (or at least water-resistant). Range bags typically have a variety of pockets and compartments to accommodate gun-related paraphernalia and feature heavy-duty zippers, robust stitching, molle webbing, and rugged 600D (or stronger) fabric ( 1 ) shells. Many also have locking zippers that add an extra level of security. The job of the range bag is straightforward: to enable safe, secure transport of your firearm. What do You Carry in a Range Bag? You don’t want to be left wanting for something when you get to the range so consider taking the following items. We will start with what we consider essentials and, as we get toward the bottom of the list, we’ll transition to discretionary items. Ammunition/Magazines – You should always make sure that you have more ammo with you than you think you will use. Sure, you can always buy some at the range. But that will cost you a pretty penny and there is no guarantee they will even have what you need. It is also a good idea to fill plenty of clips and take them with you, instead of wasting time at the range on tasks that should be done at home. Eye and Ear Protection – You are not going to find a legit range that does not require eye and ear protection. So your range bag should be large enough to accommodate both. Most range bags do not have dedicated pockets for these items. Instead they expect you to use the large center compartment. If you forget your protection, the range will probably have something you can use. But quality may be an issue. A First Aid Kit – While range operators stress safety and proper handling of firearms at every turn, stuff happens anyway ( 2 ). Because of that you should alway have a first aid kit in your range bag, just in case. The first aid kit can also come in handy if you are in an accident driving to or from the range. A Multitool – A multitool, in case you are not aware, is like a Swiss Army Knife only much more heavy-duty. They are the perfect 21st century all-purpose tool with a thousand applications. The typical multitool will include pliers, cutting blades, a saw blade, screwdrivers, a wirecutter, a bottle opener, a can opener and a lot more. By having a good multitool in your range bag you are ready for any eventuality. A Good Tactical Knife – A tactical knife is a knife that can be used for practical purposes or self-defense. They are typically light and tough and most (not all) have a full tang blade. You may only use it sporadically at the range. But, like your sidearm, it’s a good friend to have with you as you navigate an increasingly dangerous world. Paper Plates – Paper plates? We’re not suggesting you picnic at the range. Instead, we like to bring along paper plates because they make affordable targets. Extra targets at the range may run you a buck apiece. Whereas paper plates cost less than a penny each. Don’t forget to bring some double-sided tape or a stapler to hang your paper plates or other targets. A Gun Mat – You may need to strip your weapon while at the gun range. If you do you will be very glad to have a good gun mat with you. It will keep everything in one place and prevent parts from falling through cracks or onto the floor. They’re cheap and they will save you a lot of potential hassle. A Spotting Scope – Spotting scopes ( 3 ) are often used by birdwatchers but they come in mighty handy at the gun range as well. With a good spotting scope there is no need to guess if you hit the target, regardless of how far away the target is. You get near instant feedback on how well you’re doing so you can make adjustments and not waste time. A Tactical Flashlight – Few things have changed as radically in recent years as the flashlight. Today’s tactical flashlight is a sleek, compact, waterproof device with an LED bulb that produces clear, brilliant light and lasts for decades. Tactical flashlights also have scalloped bezels that can be introduced to the face of would be attackers to convince them of the error of their ways ( 4 ). Or you can use them at the range to peer down your barrel. A Rangefinder – This is mostly of interest to long-range shooters who need an easy way to determine the distance to the target. A range finder ( 5 ) is a luxury item to be sure. But if you are into hitting the range with your rifle you will probably be happy to have it in your bag. A Wind Gauge – The wind gauge also falls into the category of ‘luxury items’. Any long-range shooter understands how the wind can affect their shot. Some well-trained types can gauge wind speed by watching the trees, bushes, ground debris or smoke. Most of us, however, are not so crafty and could use a bit of technological help. Misc Items Batteries – If you are using electronic protection for your ears ( 6 ) you don’t want to be caught with dead batteries. Make sure you always have plenty of batteries with you. A Towel – Things can get pretty hot and sticky at the rifle range in the summer. It pays to have a towel with you to wipe away the sweat from your face and hands. A Log Book – Logging the number of shots you take with a particular firearm can be useful for maintenance purposes. It can also be handy to have a record of your performance on hand so you can tell if you’re making progress. And don’t forget the pen or you will have no way to make entries into your log book. Handy Wipes – Once you finish up it can pay to have some pre-moistened towelettes at the ready to wipe residue off your hands and do a cursory wipe down of your sidearm (except for any wooden handles). Water – On those hot, sweaty days you’re going to need to have some water on hand so you don’t become dehydrated. Are All Range Bags the Same Size? No, range bags come in all sizes and configurations. Some are little more than duffle bags with a little extra structure to them, others are quite rigid and have numerous pockets, sleeves and compartments to keep your gear in perfect order. Some range bags are about the size of a shoe box, while others can be a foot and a half long or more. Which one is right for you will depend on how much of what type of gear you have. Is There a ‘Best Way’ to Organizing a Range Bag? Not really. The best way is whatever way you are most comfortable with. Some folks like the idea of a big central compartment they can just dump everything into. Others want to keep things orderly so they can find what they’re looking for quickly when they need it. What Should I Look for in a Range Bag? Appearance – The gun range is not the fashion runway. But at the same time who wants to show up with their beautiful sidearm in a paper bag? Your gun bag should suggest that you know what the hell you’re doing. A great looking, high-quality bag not only shines a favorable light on you, it also sends a message to others at the range that you’re not a loose cannon. Durability – A range bag needs to be able to stand up to years of wear and tear. In all likelihood you will be toting around a fair amount of gear, so the seams can’t come apart, the zippers need to stay intact, and the shoulder strap should stand the test of time. Bar tacking ( 7 ) on high-stress areas is also a good thing to have. And the bag should be water-resistant or completely waterproof. Organization – Different range bags offer different ways to arrange your gear. Some just have a big central compartment and a couple of side pockets. While others are much more involved and have dedicated pockets and sleeves for magazines, a knife, a first aid kit, a flashlight and more. Which type of bag you choose will depend on A) how much gear you have and B) whether you crave organization or are more of a ‘dump it in and sort it out later’ type of person. Storage Capacity – How much capacity you will need depends on what type and how many firearms you are carrying. If you plan on taking your revolver and a couple of pistols you will need a lot of storage capacity for the guns and all the different ammo. If, on the other hand, you just take your Glock 19 out for some practice a few times a year your storage requirements will be relatively modest. Comfort – If you put everything on the above list in your range bag it’s going to get heavy. So it’s important that the bag be well-balanced and comfortable, even when full. A padded shoulder strap is a nice thing to have. But not all range bags offer them. If you want one, make sure the bag you have your eye on offers one. Security – Remember, these are firearms you’re carrying in this bag. Not school books. Not a laptop. The range bag needs to be secure with high-quality zippers that won’t fail. Many range bags also offer locking zippers. If you think this is necessary to secure your gun(s) then by all means, look for a bag with locking zippers. The Bottom Line A range bag is a must if you are determined to spend time at the range perfecting your shooting skills. Every time you leave the house without your gun and associated paraphernalia being properly secured you run the risk of an accident. The best range bags feature robust construction, durable fabrics, high-quality zippers, and multiple storage compartments. They provide a dry, secure place to store your firearm while in transit. Use the above information to determine exactly which range bag is right for your particular needs.

Ranking the 10 Best Survival Knives of 2020

No matter what type of outdoor adventure activity you prefer, there’s always the possibility that things can go sideways with little to no warning. Adventure travel is, by definition, unpredictable. We can quickly find ourselves in a survival situation and, when that happens, it’s critical that we have the right tools at our disposal. In these circumstances, a trusty survival knife could make all the difference in a life or death situation. Survival knives can be used in a variety of situations, including camping, hunting, hiking, and prepping . These knives are designed to be deployed quickly in case of an emergency. River guides, backpackers, hunters, and emergency preppers alike have myriad uses for a quality survival knife. In this article, we’ll review the 10 Best Survival Knives of 2020 and provide the important criteria to consider before buying a survival knife. 1. Bear Grylls Ultimate Knife- Serrated Blade Click Here for the Lowest Price The "Bear Grylls Ultimate" Knife is the ultimate survival knife! It’s a high-quality knife loaded with survival features. Bear Grylls has teamed up with the well-known survival company Gerber to design an excellent fixed blade survival knife option in their Ultimate Knife. The blade is a high carbon stainless steel material, with a drop point shape and serrated edge. To make it a true survival knife, Bear Grylls has designed it with a few life-saving extras that are unique to his design. These features include a rubber handle, whistle, stainless steel hammer pommel, lashing strap holes, lanyard cord, and a fire starter with ferrocerium rod and knife sharpener built into the included sheath. The knife is 10″ long with a 4.8″ long blade, weighing 14.7 ounces with the sheath. 2. Spyderco Bushcraft G-10 Check price on Amazon The Spyderco Bushcraft G-10 is a knife designed for the survivalist in the Bushcraft style. Bushcraft is inspired by the Bushmen of the Southern Hemisphere, with the idea of learning how to survive in the wilderness with only a knife. Syperco’s Bushcraft G-10 is a 4″ blade knife that is fully tanged. The blade is a Scandinavian style with a single bevel grind, made of O-1 high carbon steel. The knife is 8.75″ overall, weighing 7.75 ounces. It has a lanyard hole in the handle and comes with a leather sheath. This knife is an excellent option if you are looking to perform wilderness duties in the traditional Bushcraft style such as whittling, skinning, chopping, and slicing. 3. SOG Seal Pup Elite E37T-K Check price on Amazon The SOG Seal Pup Elite is a fixed blade, high quality, and high-performance knife. This knife is on the high end of the SOG Seal products. The Seal Pup Elite was designed for military use and is one of the preferred blades in Special Forces. It features a 4.85″ AUS8 stainless steel heat treated blade for added strength and durability. The blade is partially serrated with a longer cutting edge and a newly designed clip point shape. The blade has a 0.19″ thickness, with an overall weight of 5.4 ounces for the knife and is 9.5″ long.  The knife has a black finish, which is something unique to the SOG brand- a titanium nitrade (TiNi ) coating which is one of the strongest coatings that can be applied to metal. That finish in conjunction with SOG’s proprietary cryogenic heat treatment process ensures that your knife will be incredibly durable. 4. ESEE-4 Check price on Amazon The ESEE-4 knife is one of the most popular knives available from the ESEE brand. Although there are other knife models available from ESEE such as the 5 and 6, we believe that the slightly smaller size and lighter weight of the 4 make it a more practical and versatile EDC /tactical knife. The blade is stainless steel, 4.5″ long and the full knife only weighs 8 ounces. This blade is made of durable 1095 carbon steel . ESEE makes it easy to order your knife and customize to your preference, including blade type (serrated or plain edge), removable handles, and various blade finishes (black, desert tan, dark earth, un-coated, stainless steel). You can also add MOLLE backs to the blade to optimize carrying with your MOLLE webbing . The ESEE knife guarantee cannot be beaten as each knife has a lifetime warranty unconditionally. 5. Buck 119 Special Check price on Amazon The Buck 119 Special is classic, proven, and very popular knife. The Buck knife brand has been around for 75 years when they started making knives to send to troops after Pearl Harbor. This knife has an embossed logo on the leather sheath and a stamp on the blade, so some may want to own this knife as a keepsake. This blade is 6″ long and the knife weighs 7.5 ounces. The 119 Special is a clip blade, meaning it has a crescent tip with a sharper and thinner point than other blade styles. This makes it great for poking holes or other intricate knife work. The blade is made of 420 HC steel which is exclusive to Buck knives. It combines the durability of high carbon alloys with the corrosion resistance of steel. Their proprietary heat treatment method creates a strong and durable blade that will be a great asset in your survival needs. 6. CRKT M-16 12Z Check price on Amazon The CRKT M-16 12Z is rugged, tough, and small survival knife designed for EDC. Columbia River’s Knife and Tools (CRKT) brand have a huge variety of survival knives to fit your needs. The M-16 series has several different choices, but we have chosen to highlight the M-16 12Z Zytel Serrated Edge Tanto Blade Knife. This is a folding knife with a Carson Flipper extension that is unique to CRKT knives. This extends the blade and also helps to open the blade, and can all conveniently be done with one hand. The patented CRKT AutoLAWKS system is a perfected safety system for their folding knives, allowing you to feel as secure using it as you would with a fixed blade, with the convenience of carrying a folding knife. It ensures that the locking system cannot accidentally close when the blade is open and locked. Along with these excellent safety features, the blade is durable and has a limited lifetime warranty. 7. Fällkniven A1 Fine Edge Fixed Blade Check price on Amazon The Fällkniven A1 is a heavy duty, high quality, and top of the line blade designed for heavy use.  Fällkniven is a Sweden based knife making company. They are known for high-quality knives at a slightly higher price point. The A1 is an excellent option for a survival knife, it is extremely sharp and the large blade is great for large or small tasks. It is made of laminated VG10 steel, and the tang extends all the way through to the end of the handle, making a very durable knife and a strong pommel if you need to strike anything. It comes with a black leather sheath that is also durable and easy to carry or attach to packs. It has excellent balance and a high quality feel with the convex ground blade. This knife is larger than some of the others we’ve reviewed with a 6.3″ blade and an overall length of 11”. 8. Gerber LMF II Survival Knife Click Here for the Lowest Price The Gerber LMF II is a top rated, military-inspired, and rugged fixed blade knife. Gerber is a well-known creator of knives and tools. Their Survival Knife was designed by a former military man and was field tested to ensure it was up to their rigorous standards. Gerber added some unique changes to the design of this knife by adding a pointed stainless steel butt-cap at the end of the blade that can be used to break glass in case of emergency. With this innovation, they only have the tang extend about 3/4 of the way through the handle, purposefully separating it from the stainless steel butt-cap to help with shock absorption and prevent electrical shock when in use. The knife handle has a comfortable grip with lashing holes. The sheath is thoughtfully designed as well and includes a built-in carbide sharpener and belt attachment. This is a 10″ serrated fixed blade knife, that is both strong and durable. 9. Tom Brown Tracker Knife Click Here for the Lowest Price The Tom Brown Tracker knife is a large and extremely versatile survival knife designed specifically for survival situations. This knife from TOPS brand was designed by survival expert Tom Brown Jr. It was featured in the movie “The Hunted”, has been on the cover of Blade Magazin e , and is a serious survival knife. The knife is 11.88″ long, with a 6.38″ blade that is 1/4″ thick. The blade is made of 1095 high carbon alloy with a black traction coating. It was designed to be able to be used for multiple different tasks in a survival situation, such as chop, split, carve, hammer, scrape, saw, engrave, and even break metal wire. This fixed blade knife has multiple parts to the blade. It has two parts that can carve or chop and, along the spine, there are sawback serrations that mean business and jimping to give added confidence in your grip. The knife also comes with a kydex sheath with a rotating spring steel clip to easily attach it to your pack or hip, weighing 26 ounces total. 10. KaBar Becker Campanion BK2 Check price on Amazon The KaBar Becker BK2 is a fixed blade knife with a drop point blade and is fully tanged. The blade is 5.25″ with an overall length of 10.5″ for the knife. It is a little heavier than some of the other knives we reviewed at 16 ounces, but that is probably due in part to its durable 1/4″ thick blade made of 1095 cro-van steel. As the name states, this “campanion” is great to have when camping and enjoying nature. Although not as useful for intricate work, this knife is great for outdoor tasks. The handle feels comfortable in your grip, made of Grivory and comes with a glass-filled nylon sheath. — Buyer’s Guide When choosing the best survival knife, there are many things to consider including blade types and material. As you might have noticed there is a wide variety in price which is something to consider. We reviewed a lot of good quality budget knives as well as some high-end knives. In this Buyer’s Guide , we are going to focus on the major characteristics to consider when buying a survival knife. Tang The first feature we’re going to discuss is tang. Tang is the back part of the blade where it connects to the handle. There are many types of tang, but the main types that we are going to outline here are full tang, half tang, push tang, rat tail tang, and encapsulated tang. Full Tang In a knife with a full tang, the metal extends through to the end of the handle. In this design, the metal part of the knife is one solid piece and the two layers of the handle are then pinned onto the blade on each side. These are generally the strongest knives on the market. Half Tang Knives that feature partial (or half) tang are generally less sturdy and the blade can become loose over time and with tough use. The metal part of the knife extends along the entire length of the handle but is usually only half the width of the handle. Push Tang In a push tang design, the metal part of the knife is pushed into the handle and then secured using glue or epoxy. This type of knife is typically available in either full push or half push varieties. Full push tang knives are designed with the metal pushed all the way to the full length of the handle. Half push tang knives only secure the metal blade down to half the length of the handle. Rat Tail Tang In this design, the tang of the knife narrows as you move closer to the butt end of the knife’s handle. At the end, the tang is either threaded or welded to a piece of threaded rod. To finish the design, a bolt or threaded pommel is used to secure the blade to the handle. Encapsulated Tang As its name suggests, this tang is entirely smaller than the size of the handle. The knife’s handle is then fitted or molded around the entirety of the blade to create an “encapsulated” feel. Steel Most of the best survival knives are manufactured using some type of steel. While there are a huge variety of steels out there, most blades are commonly made of either high carbon steel or stainless steel. Some knife manufacturers go a step further and coat these steels to provide extra strength and improve corrosion resistance. But for all practical purposes, we’ll discuss the pros and cons of stainless steel and high carbon steel here. Stainless Steel Stainless steel blades generally contain at least 12 percent chromium. This is important because it improves the blade’s ability to resist rust and corrosion while also making them easier to sharpen. However, stainless steel knives generally need to be sharpened more often because they lose their edge more quickly. This is because stainless steel blades are generally softer than their high carbon steel counterparts. High Carbon Steel High carbon steel tends to be tougher and more durable than stainless steel. Carbon is, indeed, the hardest element and, as a result, it produces blades that offer superior edge retention. However, high carbon steel blades don’t include a drop of chromium. This means that they have very poor ability to resist rust and corrosion. High carbon steel blades need to be cleaned and maintained more frequently in order to retain their sharpness. Blade Patterns There are also a couple of different blade patterns to consider. The main blade patterns that you’ll see in survival knives are drop point and clip point. Drop Point In blades with a drop point pattern, the spine of the blade slopes from the handle to the point, with a convex blade shape. This is most common in hunting knives. Clip Point In blades with a clip point pattern, the front third of the blade is essentially “clipped off”. This means that the spine tapers off to the tip and is not as thick. This allows a quicker and deeper stabbing motion. Additional Features/Uses Once you’ve really gotten into the technical specifications of knives and narrowed down your choices based on those criteria, it’s useful to look at the additional features that some knives come with. Not all knives are used just for cutting. Some blades come with a fire starter, whistle, or even paracord . These items have specific uses that go beyond what your knife can be useful for. Finding a knife that comes with a few additional items is like bargain shopping. If you can get multiple items for a more affordable price, it’s hard to argue against that. Frequently Asked Questions Many people consider a survival knife to be an essential item in a bug out bag . Whatever your reason for carrying a survival knife, make sure you get the best knife for you and your situation. In this section, we’re going to answer some of the most common questions about using and taking care of survival knives. How often should I sharpen my survival knife? This obviously depends on how frequently it is used and what it’s used for. If you don’t use your blade often or use it only on softer objects, you may only need to sharpen the blade once or twice a year. Conversely, you can hone your knife blade much more frequently. Honing realigns the microscopic teeth of the blade but doesn’t require the removal of steel to create a brand new edge. What’s the best way to clean a survival knife? The first (and arguably best) way to keep your knife clean is to keep it dry. If it does get wet, make sure you dry it as quickly as possible. Then, it’s great to apply a light layer of oil. This is especially important if your knife comes into contact with salt water or another corrosive substance. If you go with a folding survival knife, also take extra time to pay special attention to the hinge where the knife folds into the handle. This is a classic area where dirt, water, and other debris can accumulate and negatively impact the performance of your knife. Is there a way to get rid of rust accumulated on a knife blade? There are a variety of methods to remove rust from your knife blade. The first is by using baking soda. In this method, clean the knife with water first and then create a paste using a fair amount of baking soda and water (or lemon juice). Then, apply the paste to the entire length of the blade with a toothbrush before using steel wool or an abrasive sponge to remove the paste and rust along with it. Finish by wiping the blade clean with water and then drying it thoroughly. Another method you can use to get rust off your blade is by placing it in a vinegar bath. Fill a cup or bowl with white vinegar and place the blade in the “bath” for about five minutes. Be careful not to leave it in the bath for any longer than this, as you risk permanently damaging the blade if you do so. Once you remove the blade from the bath, wipe it down with water and then dry thoroughly. Sometimes, you’ll have to follow this method with the baking soda method to remove heavy accumulations of rust. Summary Survival knives can and have been used in a variety of situations. While having a pocket knife on you is handy, sometimes having a reliable survival knife can make a huge difference. Since survival knives have large and sturdy blades, they can be used to whittle, carve, saw, chop, skin game, and for many other uses. We hope you’ve enjoyed this review of the best survival knives of 2019 and we wish you the best of luck finding the right knife and on your next adventures!

A Look at Leupolds New MOA-based TS-32X1 Reticle

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d7d989ae_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d7d989ae_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Trying to decode conflicting measurement systems on rifle scopes using MOA- turrets with Mil-based reticles is now a thing of the past on Leupold's line of optics thanks to their new TS-32X1 MOA-based reticle. MOA-based reticles aren't new, but now Leupold is adding this option to its line of scopes with the introduction of the TS-32X1 reticle, a minute-of-angle (MOA) based system designed to allow for precision shots without the need for dial adjustments. It features a heavy post and thin stadia crosshair with 1-MOA hashmarks on both the horizontal and vertical lines. Every other hash mark on the horizontal stadia is slightly longer, giving simple 2-MOA measurement reference. Every four MOA is indicated by a number. The vertical stadia is also set up with 1-MOA tics and longer 2-MOA marks. In addition, every fourth mark is numbered, all the way to the complete 32-MOA elevation range. Wind dots in the lower half of the reticle are spaced in 2 MOA increments, both vertically and horizontally, very similar to the Horus Vision design that's become so popular. Related GunDigest Articles Video: Action Rifle Shooting with Jerry Miculek Shooting Circles Video: Field Shooting Positions - Prone, Bipod Supported This system allows for immediate and precise holdovers and wind holds as well as range estimation. The TS-32X1 is the first in a family of MOA-based reticles that will cover several magnification ranges.

Summary

by Erik Meisner If you’ve ever been to a shooting range, you’ve probably heard the term, “eyes and ears”. This is a shortened term for the most basic and essential pieces of safety equipment required for a day of shooting sports, eye protection and ear protection . Howard Leight is a company that is no stranger to protecting your hearing in either the workplace or in a sporting environment and has been at the cutting edge of preventing occupational hearing loss for over 30 years.